Tag Archives: Story Teller

The Stalker

Most people are familiar with the feeling of being stalked. An unnerving feeling of having a person watch your daily moves, practice covert surveillance and gather information about your life without ever revealing their efforts.

Some of us are unlucky enough to have been stalked or bullied by a former friend, partner, school mate or colleague. This person lurks in the shadows, menacing the victim. Their intent is not for direct confrontation, but to undermine mental stability and create panic which results in self destruction. It is a cowardly method of attack, but very effective.

Anti-salmon farming activist Alexandra Morton has stalked salmon farmers for most of her lifetime.

Not all salmon farmers in BC are susceptible to her attacks, but some are extremely vulnerable. Young men and women, First Nation employees, workers that live in small island communities, and the employees who work and live at remote salmon farms far removed from their families. These employees are scared to leave their float house, and to be photographed from a distance by Morton’s telephoto lens, to be identified and shamed in public. They are nervous at their workplace on the open ocean, and at their homes.vlcsnap-2016-07-25-11h47m41s667

Not that Morton will ever physically or verbally attack salmon farmers. Quite the opposite. She is polite, respectful, even gracious in her interactions with staff. For the goal of a stalker is never direct confrontation, it is to watch the prey lose its nerves and stop functioning.

Morton is too familiar with the courts to put herself on the wrong side of the law, unless it is an arrest that will win her public sympathy. She’ll never be charged with a violent crime. She’s not about to get charged for sexual harassment either. However, earlier this year she took and published a photo of a female employee in a vulnerable position. She invited an online discussion of the photo containing many sexist and derogatory comments about this employee. She only posts the photo, and lets her congregation do the dirty work.

And while Morton may not physically or verbally attack her victim, her Facebook followers scramble to express their allegiance to her in very concerning ways.Alexis in school

This is Canada, 2017. We should not, and do not, tolerate individuals causing fear through bullying, harassment, intimidation or stalking.

Sea Shepherd throwing around a (red) herring

 Sea Shepherd throwing around a (red) herring

The following conversation posted on the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society Facebook page shows the Sea Shepherd caught in a lie. Although Sea Shepherd leader, Paul Watson, admits that “lying to everyone is OK” as long as it served his cause, we’d suggest Sea Shepherd try harder to make the lie more resilient to a simple web search.Insert 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Herring fisheries have been closed for 31 years” (since 1986) they say. “The decline is not due to overfishing” they say.

We fact checked, and what we found probably won’t surprise you: Sea Shepherd is wrong. Dead wrong, in fact.

The last time a herring fishery occurred in the Broughton area (referred to as fishing area 12) was in 1976 – 40 years ago – and a full decade before the first farm-raised salmon was stocked into the area. But perhaps more relevant, the last consistent fishery took place in Area 12 in the 1950s: well over 30 years before the words “salmon farming” was uttered by a Canadian (see Figure 1).

According to life-long fishermen, this area and others with similar attributes (depth, current, temperature, and phytoplankton) are productive “nursery” grounds for herring, but they don’t often produce fish that are the right size for commercial catch.

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Figure 1: Broughton Archipelago herring fishery (Area 12, subsection 125W). For coast map of all regions, see http://www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/science/species-especes/pelagic-pelagique/herring-hareng/herspawn/jstr_map-eng.html

 Coast wide, B.C.’s herring fishery collapsed in the mid-1960s (see Figure 2). But there are a few known catch areas in British Columbia that still produce fish large enough to catch, consistently: Haida Gwaii, Central Coast, and Georgia Strait. In fact, the Georgia Strait had a record high catch of herring in 2016.

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Figure 2: BC Herring Catch and Estimated Spawners (1900-2017). Read more at http://www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/science/species-especes/pelagic-pelagique/herring-hareng-eng.html

 So, Sea Shepherd is lying about of the Pacific Herring fishery in British Columbia.

But are they right when they say “Alaska doesn’t farm salmon”? We’ll leave you with this photo of one salmon aquaculture facility in Alaska:

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OK, just one more photo then we’re done…

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